Under Armour takes notice of Austin-grown Handana

 

Katie Niemeyer's product, Handana, was runner-up at Under Armour's Future Show. Photo courtesy Under Armour.
Katie Niemeyer’s product, Handana, was runner-up at Under Armour’s Future Show. Photo courtesy Under Armour.

 

Congrats to Katie Niemeyer, who invented a snazzy little wristband called the Handana that’s perfect for wiping away sweat (or snot) when you run.

The Handana was named runner up at this year’s Under Armour Future Show Innovation Challenge. RaesWear, a company that sells pouches to carry things like phone, keys and cash, won the competition. (But hey, we’ve already got SPIbelt, from Austin’s own Kim Overton, for that!)

Under Armour invites a handful of entrepreneurs to participate in its Innovation Challenge, a sort of in-house trade show. Employees vote on their favorite items, and a few are chosen to be presented to company executives. (Think “Shark Tank,” that television show where people pitch their inventions to folks who might fund them.)

Handana was up against some stiff (and athletic) competition. Other finalists were CoachUp, Arccos golf performance tracker and Tangram Smart Rope.

RaesWear won the $50,000 prize, but Under Armour executive vice president of innovation Kevin Haley says the company will do some kind of business with all the finalists.

“Whether you’re talking to a well-funded Silicon Valley startup with $200 million in venture capital money, or that person in their garage, or to Dow Chemical who happens to have a new polymer with potential – they’re all in the same boat in some ways,” Haley says. “They lack the four things we can provide – the brand, the marketing, the distribution and the sourcing.”

 

Yoga with Authors session planned as part of Texas Book Festival

The Texas Book Festival will host a Yoga with Authors session Saturday morning. Photo courtesy Modo Yoga
The Texas Book Festival will host a Yoga with Authors session Saturday morning. Photo courtesy Modo Yoga

We told you last week about kayaking with authors during the Texas Book Festival. Now you can practice yoga with some of the authors, too.

Four authors will participate in the session on the Capitol lawn. Photo courtesy Modo Yoga
Four authors will participate in the session on the Capitol lawn. Photo courtesy Modo Yoga

The directors of Modo Yoga Austin – Meghan McCracken and Gillian Brockett – will lead the Yoga with Authors session from 8-9 a.m. Oct. 17 on the Capitol lawn, Congress Avenue at East 11th Street.

Well-known authors Neal Pollack (“Downward-Facing Death,” “Jewball” and “Alternadad”), Catherine Lacey (“No One is Ever Missing”), Elisa Albert (“After Birth,” “The Book of Dahlia” and “How This Night Is Different”) and Meera Subramnian (“A River Runs Again: India’s Natural World in Crisis”) will participate.

The event is open to the public, but limited to the first 20 people who register. Sign up here.

Portions of Southern Walnut Creek Trail closed for maintenance

Parts of the Southern Walnut Creek Trail are closed for maintenance.
Parts of the Southern Walnut Creek Trail are closed for maintenance.

Heads up, cyclists.

Maintenance work on the Southern Walnut Creek Trail continues, and the portion of the trail between Loyoa Lane and the trail spur at the Austin Tennis Center is now closed.

The trail will remain closed today through Friday and again Monday through Oct. 23 to address erosion issues. It will be open during weekends.

During the closure, trail users can exit the trail south of Loyola Lane and use bicycle facilities on Loyola Lane, or exit at the Austin Tennis Center and use Johnny Morris Lane to access Loyola Lane.

The work from Delwau Lane to FM 969 is now complete.

For more information, contact Nadia Barrera at 512-974-7142 or nadia.barrera@austintexas.gov.

Kevin Breeland almost died, now he’s doing the Austin Heart Walk

The Austin Heart Walk is scheduled for Saturday at the Long Center.
The Austin Heart Walk is scheduled for Saturday at the Long Center.

Kevin Breeland almost didn’t live to participate in this year’s Austin Heart Walk.

Kevin Breeland recuperates in a hospital after his heart attack in December 2013. Family photo
Kevin Breeland recuperates in a hospital after his heart attack in December 2013. Family photo

Breeland, 58, nearly died two years ago, when he suffered a heart attack at his home in Georgetown. Emergency medical crews performed CPR on him for an hour and a half, and jolted him with a defibrillator 37 times before his heart began beating again.

“I was dead for 45 minutes,” he says.

Breeland had a history of heart disease in his family – his biological father, grandfather and two uncles all died of it, and his sister and mother also had heart problems. Yet he ignored it. He was overweight and out of shape, and didn’t eat a healthy diet.

“All my doctors tell me how lucky I am to be alive,” he says. “When I came to a week later, I was on dialysis and machines hooked up to me. I ended up being in the hospital a month, then rehab for four months.”

Today he’s thankful for every day. On Saturday, Breeland’s daughter, sister, aunt and friends will join him for the Austin Heart Walk at the Long Center, 701 West Riverside Drive.

The annual event is a part of the American Heart Association’s “My Heart. My Life” movement, which aims to improve heart health of Americans and decrease the number of deaths due to heart disease and stroke. The American Heart Association hopes to raise $1 million to help fund research, education and outreach that support heart health.

Kevin Breeland walks his daughter down the aisle. Family photo
Kevin Breeland walks his daughter down the aisle. Family photo

Heart disease is the top killer of Americans. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. According to the American Heart Association, 80 percent of cases are preventable.

“Even though a lot of heart disease is hereditary, there are things you can do to protect yourself – eating right, exercising and all the things I didn’t do,” Breeland says.”We have to raise awareness.”

Breeland has lost 60 pounds since his heart attack, and walks and takes the stairs when he can. Still, he knows he needs to get back to the gym more often. Recovery has been slow, and Breeland says if he’d been in better shape leading up to the heart attack he could have recovered more quickly.

“The reality of it is I feel pretty good, better than have in years,” he says.

The non-competitive 5K walk begins at 8 a.m. at The Long Center. The event will include an interactive Kids’ Zone and complimentary heart and health screening. Adults, children and pets are welcome.

There is no fee to participate in the walk, but donations are accepted. For the first time this year, a 5K chip-timed run will be part of the lineup. Entry fee for the timed run is $40. To register for either event, go here or call 512-338-2400.

Open water swim race set for Tuesday at Quarry Lake

The final open water swim race of the season at Pure Austin Quarry Lake is scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 13.
The final open water swim race of the season at Pure Austin Quarry Lake is scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 13.

Heads up, swimmers.

Daylight is dwindling, but water at the Pure Austin Quarry Lake is still warm. That means there’s time for one more Open Water Swim Race.

The final race of the season is set for 6 p.m. Tuesday at the lake,  4210 West Braker Lane.

Swimmers can choose from a 750-meter or 1,500-meter race.
Swimmers can choose from a 750-meter or 1,500-meter race.

Swimmers can choose from two distances – a 1,500-meter swim (two loops around the lake) or a 750-meter swim (one loop). Top finishers in male, female and masters categories will receive prizes from Zen, Lucky Robot, Austin Massage Co. and Austin East Ciders.

Entry fee is $20. Register online here or at the Pure Austin front desk through 4 p.m. race day. Onsite registration opens at 5 p.m. at the race site. 

The races will start separately – one at 6 p.m. and the other five minutes later.

For more information email Peri Kowal at kowalperi@gmail.com or Julie Stupp at  lj.stupp@gmail.com.

Free bike mechanic clinic Saturday at Dove Springs

A free bike mechanic class is scheduled for Saturday at Dove Springs Recreation Center.
A free bike mechanic class is scheduled for Saturday at Dove Springs Recreation Center.

 

Not sure how to fix a flat? Need to check your brakes?

Bike Austin will host a mechanics workshop Saturday at the Dove Springs Recreation Center, 5801 Ainez Drive.

Hour-long, basic bike maintenance classes will be taught in English and Spanish starting at 10 a.m.

The first 25 people to complete each class will receive free bike locks. Ten additional sets of bike lights also will be raffled off.

Bring your own bicycle. Professional bike mechanics will be on hand with tools, tubes and tires. Kids and adults are welcome.

Here’s the schedule:

10-11 a.m. – Repair class

11 a.m.-noon – Bike rodeo and repairs

Noon-1 p.m. – Repair class

Documentary about cross-country bike race screens in Austin Tuesday

Billy Rice, an endurance cyclist from Texas, appears in a new documentary about a cross-country bicycle race. Photo courtesy Inspired to Ride.
Billy Rice, an endurance cyclist from Texas, appears in a new documentary about a cross-country bicycle race. Photo courtesy Inspired to Ride.

No teams. No support vehicles. No special jerseys. And no prize money.

Juliana Buhring was one of a handful of cyclists who rode across the country in the Trans Am Race. Photo courtesy 'Inspired to Ride.'
Juliana Buhring was one of a handful of cyclists who rode across the country in the Trans Am Bike Race. Photo courtesy ‘Inspired to Ride.’

“Inspired to Ride,” a new film by the producers of “Ride the Divide,” follows a handful of cyclists as they race unsupported 4,233 miles across the United States.

The film will screen at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13 at the Alamo Drafthouse, 1120 South Lamar Boulevard. Tickets are $12 in advance here or at the door.

Producer and director Mike Dion will lead a Q&A session after the screening, and Texas endurance cyclist Billy Rice, who appears in the film, will attend and talk more about the Trans Am Bike Race.

The ride is unsupported and awards no cash prize. Photo courtesy 'Inspired to Ride'
The ride is unsupported and awards no cash prize. Photo courtesy ‘Inspired to Ride’

Rice and his daughter Lina recently finished the Tour Divide Race on a tandem, making 16-year-old Lina the youngest person to complete the grueling mountain bike race. (We know you’re dying to ask Billy Rice what it is was like traveling more than 2,700 miles on a tandem with a teen-ager.)

For more information go here.  Watch a trailer here.

Whole Earth Provision Co. set to reopen on North Lamar

The North Lamar location of Whole Earth Provision Co. was inundated with 3 feet of water in May. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.
The North Lamar location of Whole Earth Provision Co. was inundated with 3 feet of water in May. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.

Whole Earth Provision Co. on North Lamar Boulevard reopens next week, five months after Shoal Creek flooded and inundated the store with more than 3 feet of muddy water.

In addition to structural damage, almost all the inventory at the store, at 1014 N. Lamar Boulevard, was ruined in this year’s Memorial Day floods, manager Holland Jones said at the time.

The store's worst flood occurred this year. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.
The store’s worst flood occurred this year. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.

The Oct. 17 reopening kicks off a two-week Coming Home-Giving Back campaign. Whole Earth will donate 5 percent of the store’s sales on the weekends of Oct. 17-18 and Oct. 24-25 to The Barnabas Connection Flood Relief for Wimberley and 5 percent to the Shoal Creek Conservancy. Customers can also donate through a register fund drive.

“We are extremely grateful for our loyal customers who continued to trade at the University of Texas campus and Westgate locations; for our dedicated and flexible staff; for our wonderful friends and neighbors who provided all manner of generous support in the aftermath of the flood and for the excellent work done for the renovation of our North Lamar store,” Whole Earth founder Jack Jones said in a press release.

Employees unpack new stock for the store on North Lamar Boulevard. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.
Employees unpack new stock for the store on North Lamar Boulevard. Photo courtesy Whole Earth Provision Co.

Whole Earth was founded near the University of Texas campus on Dec. 14, 1970. Today it operates nine stores in Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Houston and Southlake.

The North Lamar location has flooded at least three times since it opened about 15 years ago, but this year’s damage was the worst, Holland Jones said at the time.

During the Coming Home-Giving Back campaign, customers can enter drawings for prizes including Yeti coolers, a stand-up paddle board, a GoPro camera, a sleeping bag and packs from Marmot, day packs and duffels from The North Face, sunglasses, shoes, clothing and more. Entries will be accepted at the North Lamar location between Oct. 17 and Oct. 25.

 

Kristin McLain’s Get Out Girl Paddle Jam set for Oct. 18.

Proceeds from the event benefit The Flatwater Foundation.
Proceeds from the event benefit The Flatwater Foundation.

Women of all ability levels are invited to get on the lake and paddle at Kristin McLain’s Get Out Girl Paddle Jam on Oct. 18.

The event, named for Star Flight nurse Kristin McLain, who died in a helicopter rescue accident in April, provides on-water support on an out-and-back course for women paddling standup paddleboards, kayaks and canoes. Participants can paddle between 2 and 10 miles.

This year's Get Out Girl Paddle Jam honors Kristin McLain, shown here on her paddleboard. McLain died in April.
This year’s Get Out Girl Paddle Jam honors Kristin McLain, shown here on her paddleboard. McLain died in April.

McLain, a member of Austin’s Star Flight crew for seven years, was instrumental in creating the first Get Out Girl Paddle Jam and was passionate about sharing her love of paddling and the outdoors. She liked to de-stress after a night of rescue work by paddling on Lake Austin.

Proceeds benefit the Flatwater Foundation, which helps fund mental health treatment for people who have been affected by a cancer diagnosis of a family member. The non-profit organization hosts the annual 21-mile Dam That Cancer event each year.

The Paddle Jam begins and ends at Steiner Ranch Lake Club, 12300 River Bend Road. Paddlers can launch their own vessels or boards or rent a SUP or kayak (limited boards/kayaks available.). Afterward, participants can shop sample sales, listen to music and enjoy food and drink with family and friends. The event begins at 7:30 a.m.

Entry fee is $70 if you have your own board or boat; $90 if you need to rent one. Cost includes lunch. To register, go here.

For more information about the event, contact Cindy Present at cindy@getoutgirl.com.

Pioneer Trail 5K Run set for Oct. 17

pioneer trail runEver run behind a horse?

You can at a new free 5K race at Pioneer Farms on Oct. 17.

The lead runner will chase a horse through the historic farm at this family event, organized by Erik Stanley and his Trail Roots running group. Stanley worked as a ranch hand and field trip curriculum creator at the farm when he was a student at the University of TExas, and has wanted to put on a race there ever since.

“At Trail Roots, we are constantly looking for ways to share the joy of running with new folks and this local race is the perfect opportunity,” Stanley says. “We see the ways that running enhances our lives and want to see others share in that experience.

Pioneer Farms is a historic farm in East Austin.
Pioneer Farms is a historic farm in East Austin.

And did we mention that it’s free?

“I want to develop a fun and friendly community race that everyone can afford and bring their friends and family along,” Stanley says. “Long-term, I envision more connection with other local businesses that could participate in and support the event.”

A kids’ mile starts at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K at 8:30 a.m. Both courses are on dirt roads and jeep trails.

When you’re done running, you can explore the five themed historic areas at Pioneer Farms – a Tonkawa encampment, a German emigrant farm, a Texian farm, a cotton planter’s farm and a rural village called Sprinkle Corner. You can meet farm animals at the 90-acre farm’s Scarborough Barn.

Awards will be given for the top three overall, masters top 3, and grandmasters first place, plus the top three in the kids mile.

For more information or to register go here. http://www.trailroots.com/race.html

Pioneer Farms is located at 10621 Pioneer Farms Drive. Donations will benefit the Pioneer Farms school program. Food will be available after the race.